20Mar/19

Dog Bloat- Have you heard of this?

SourceURL:https://business.google.com/posts/l/01320112259316693386 Posts Dog bloat is a common condition that can be dangerous, even deadly for our best friends. What is dog bloat? Bloat happens when a dog’s stomach fills with gas, food or fluid, making it expand. The stomach can put pressure on other organs. Bloat can cause dangerous problems such as: Restricting blood to the heart and stomach lining, tear in the wall of the stomach, difficulty breathing. In some cases, the dog’s stomach will rotate or twist trapping blood in the stomach preventing it from returning to the heart and other area of the body. This can send your dog into shock and will require immediate attention. Vets are not 100% positive what causes bloat but there are some things that can increase the risk: Eating quickly, running or playing after he eats, having one large meal a day or eating or drinking to much. At Woof, we have created processes to avoid Bloat. First, in our initial interview we ask owners about their dogs eating habits and document this in our database. Once the dog is deemed a Woof dog we carefully monitor every dogs meal and consumption. We take detailed notes every stay to limit questions regarding their eating behaviors/patterns. Lastly, we have a mandatory rest period after each meal for every dog ( typically 30 -45 minutes) to facilitate the digestion process.

13Mar/19

Benefits of Quality Day Care

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This is Rustie and Harry playing at Woof in the daycare area. Both vets and dog training professionals agree that dog daycare is a healthy way for dogs to exercise their minds and bodies. Instead of worrying that your dog is bored or anxious alone at home, you can bring them to Woof for safe, fun day in a supervised and stimulating environment. A busy dog = a happy owner. Canines often cause trouble when they are bored or anxious, destructive behaviors like chewing, biting or barking will often surface with a bored dog. These types of behaviors are not fun for your dog, your neighbors, or you. Daycare at Woof is engaging and active. Your dog will receive the physical exercise they need to stay in shape and be on your good list! Bring your dog to Woof and they will come home happy and tired!
11Mar/19

Wet weather, sick dogs…see the latest from one of our partner vets

Version:1.0 StartHTML:000000196 EndHTML:001418661 StartFragment:001417353 EndFragment:001418401 StartSelection:001417353 EndSelection:001418397 SourceURL:https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/ Fw: Kennel Cough Information – woofsanramon@gmail.com – Gmail

Hello Woof Team, We have seen an increasing number of dogs with kennel cough in the last few weeks they are coming in with symptoms after boarding or being at many of the tri-valley kennels and boarding facilities. We thought the attached may help you provide information to your dog owners about this virus, symptoms and how to care for their dogs. Please let me know if you have any questions,  Margaret Simuro Hospital Director Bishop Ranch Veterinary Center & Urgent Care O: 925.327.0790


Kennel Cough and Upper Respiratory Infections are highly contagious conditions in the upper respiratory system of dogs. When an infected dog coughs or sneezes, the disease becomes airborne and can be transmitted to other dogs without direct contact. The close proximity at dog parks, behavior classes, boarding, or grooming facilities provides the environment the disease needs to spread. Much like a cold or flu in humans, an infected dog’s immune system often clears the infection without medical intervention.
We have recently seen higher rates of dogs presenting for the common signs and symptoms of Kennel Cough and other Upper Respiratory Infections. Dr. Kristi Peterson of Bishop Ranch Veterinary Center is here to answer some of our most frequently asked questions about these infectious diseases.
What are the signs and symptoms?
Dogs with Kennel Cough or Upper Respiratory Infections often show the following signs:  Sneezing or Reverse Sneezing  Coughing  Eye and Nasal Discharge
How long does it take for the signs to resolve?
 Much like in humans, the infection is self-limiting and the dog’s immune system will mount an immune response to fight the infection within one week.
How long is my dog contagious?  Every strain is different and therefore has a varying lengths of time, however most dogs are no longer contagious after 2 weeks.
What are the common treatments?  As in people with a cold or flu, there often are not any treatments or medications necessary while the infection runs its course. If your dog is exhibiting any of the above symptoms, such as a severe cough or difficulty breathing, cough suppressants and antibiotics may be prescribed.
My dog is vaccinated, can s/he still get kennel cough?  Yes, as with the flu vaccine in humans, vaccines for dogs do not cover every strain of Kennel Cough or Upper Respiratory Infection.
When should I bring my dog in?
If your dog exhibits any of the following, they should be seen by a veterinarian for assessment:  Lethargy  Not eating  A cough so severe they cannot rest  Difficulty breathing  Concern for fever
If you are concerned your dog is in respiratory distress, has severe lethargy, or any of the above signs, please contact Bishop Ranch Veterinary Center by dialing 925-866-8387 for assistance.
We are located at:
2000 Bishop Drive San Ramon, CA 94583
Our Hours of Operation are: Monday- Friday: 7am-10pm Saturday & Sunday: 8am-8pm

11Mar/19

Did you know these foods are toxic to your best friends?

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We, as pet owners, have a desire to share foods with our best friends; however, this is not always the wisest thing to do. Here is a list of the foods we tend to enjoy but can be toxic to your dogs:
Chocolate, Alcohol, Caffeine, Grapes, Avocados, Onions, Macadamia nuts, Xylitol (artificial sweetener) Corn of the cob and Cooked bones. For more information on foods toxic to canines, go to Animal Poison Control. It is better to be safe than sorry, if you suspect your dog has eaten something toxic and is suffering, call your vet immediately.

26Apr/17

Stormy weather sickness

Happy Spring everybody!

(P.S. I proposed … .and she accepted!)

Rainy enough for ya? (Another version of, “hot enough for ya?” but somehow even more annoying.) Please excuse me – I’m a little grouchy. I’m tired of the rain! (As I write this – right now – guess what – it’s raining!)

I’m pretty sure I’ve been wearing a beanie for six solid months.

Having said that, us Californians are grateful for this (relentless) rain. Battling our drought is more important than our comfort and good hair days.

Water is life and we are thankful.

But what we’re not so thankful for, and what has pulled me out of my blog exile, is a very real health concern that has been affecting local dogs and their owners recently because of all this rainfall.

Water-borne illnesses. (See a comprehensive slide-show of them here.)

(Lady, showing harmful bacteria her true feelings.)

Leptospirosis, Giardia and other Nasty Critters have been thriving in the standing water that never gets to dry up because of all this (relentless/wonderful) rain.

Waste from wild life is the real culprit here – a deer or raccoon pees or poos, it runs downhill with the water, and thrives for weeks or months in a puddle, creek or mud.

You know – all the places your dog loves to drink from and splash around in.Those kinds of places.

This recent article cited a Bay Area dog who died earlier this year due to complications from Lepto from playing in a park. A San Francisco vet is quoted as witnessing five documented cases of Lepto-positive dogs in early 2017 in her practice alone.

Besides this one article, I’ve heard through the grapevine from my veterinary friends that Lepto is on the rise and I need to pay attention.

An artistic rendering of me and my vet friends hating everything that hurts and kills dogs. Grrrrrr.

In addition, a wonderful, healthy and happy WOOF dog had to be euthanized recently due to a bacteria he encountered playing outdoors that didn’t respond to antibiotics and hospitalization.

So I felt a public service announcement was in order: please be aware of waterborne illnesses! Especially right now while everything is still very wet out there.

Some important tips:

Don’t allow your dog to drink water from puddles or creeks – EVER.

Wash your dog thoroughly if he/she has been frolicking in mud/puddles, etc. (Or keep them on a leash and don’t let them do it until the ground dries out.)

Ask your vet about the Lepto vaccine – it is a series of two vaccines spaced 2 to 4 weeks apart (if your dog has never been vaccinated for it) and is sometimes included in the Distemper vaccine (DHLPP instead of DHPP – the L stands for Lepto) *Note the vaccine is not 100 percent effective, but certainly increases the odds of your dog not becoming seriously ill from exposure

Some facts about Lepto:

It’s more common in warmer climates

It’s transmitted through urine (think of urine settling into puddles and mud)

It’s a spiral-shaped bacteria that can live in a favorable environment for weeks or even months

It is zoonotic, which means that you CAN get it from your dog (again, from direct contact with urine from an infected animal or infected water, soil or food – so wash your hands after outdoor activities and cleaning up after your pet!)

If caught in time, it has about a 75 percent survival rate

Symptoms to look for:

lethargy

decreased appetite

increased water consumption

increased urination

vomiting

diarrhea

fever

muscle pain

red eyes

blood in urine

red-speckled gums

The toughest part is realizing something is wrong with your dog in time to start a successful course of fluids and antibiotics. The symptoms can be so subtle – not to mention general and symptoms of countless other serious and not-so-serious conditions.

Pay close attention to your dog and his/her habits. When in doubt, go to your vet and get that bloodwork or Xrays. It could truly save your dog’s life.

In the article referenced above, for example, the dog was 13 years old, so the owner, understandably, thought her lethargy and other symptoms were just signs of an older dog slowing down. By the time she went to the vet, the bacteria had spread and affected her organs too much to save her. Sadly, most of these dogs go into renal failure when their kidneys stop working and euthanasia is really the only humane option.

As for me and Lady, we are squarely in the danger zone. We hike almost every morning (very early, in the dark, before work), splashing through water and mud.

We love our early-morning hikes and take selfies to document our adventures.

Lady is older (10) and is having typical old-dog symptoms. Some days she’s tired. Some days she’s achy. Some days she doesn’t feel like eating. I have to pay close attention to what’s “normal” and what could be something serious like Lepto.

I’m sure you all feel my pain here.

So what are my choices? I can hike without Lady and break her heart. I can stop hiking altogether and break everyone’s hearts.

We can just all stop doing everything we love because there are dangers involved in living.

I say no to that.

Instead, I’ve decided to continue doing what we all love, but doing it more thoughtfully and with some key precautions.

I’ve vaccinated Lady for Lepto. I keep her on leash during the hike, and am vigilant about not allowing her to drink water off the ground. I rinse and clean her legs and underside every morning post-hike (yes, every morning, when it is still dark outside and we are all tired, which sucks for both of us, but makes me feel a whole lot better when I see her “cleaning” her legs as she rests in her doggie bed.)

We will live informed, but we will not live in fear.

I urge you all to do the same.

(I am not a veterinarian nor an expert on waterborne illnesses – please consult your veterinarian about your dogs’ lifestyle and best health choices.)

 

11Mar/16

Top 5 signs you’re a (crazy) dog person

5. You wonder if your dog is mad at you.

dog mad option

Any sign my dog gives me that doesn’t communicate unconditional and complete adoration, I interpret as negative commentary on me as a human being. I obsess: what’s she mad about? What did I do? A turned back, a still tail, cool indifference – it all tells me I’m just no good anymore, and she knows it. Overcompensation (squeaky voice, unsolicited treats, unplanned walks) ensues and soon I can bask in the glow of her good will and happiness again.

4. At a party, you talk to the dog instead of the people.

dog party better

I don’t mind talking to people – I really don’t. But if there is a dog at a party, I find myself on the floor, ruining my dress and running my stockings, saying things like, “And how was YOUR day?” Trying to impress them with my jokes. “Lame party, am-I-right?” (Raised hand for a high five.) I rarely can take a compliment given by a human, but the slightest tail flutter from a dog I just met fills me with joy and validation.

3. One glance from your dog can send you into a shame spiral.

dog guilt

This is about how your dog totally depends on you. Did they go potty? Do they have water? (Is it fresh enough?) Is someone in their bed? (The outrage referenced above). I am in charge of her life and her comfort. And as any busy human knows, you sometimes just don’t have time to go on a hike before work! And I can not take the pressure, okay? Okay, Lady? Keep your scathing looks to yourself. (Sorry sweetie, I didn’t mean that. Here’s a cookie. Mommy loves you.)

2. You irrationally dislike any dog who (seems to) dislike your dog.

dog dislike

You love your dog and therefore every living organism should also love your dog. Forget that dogs are individuals with their own preferences. Forget that your dog may have done something that dog didn’t like. Forget that they’re dogs, and you shouldn’t be judging an animal with your anthropomorphic BS. My logical brain knows disliking a dog for dissing my sweet and perfect girl is insane. But my gut knows that dog is stuck up and wouldn’t know an awesome friend if she bit her on the nose.

And NUMBER 1 (and most embarrassing): You’ve had the thought: if I could have birthed her, I would have.

dog birth better

She’s beautiful, she’s smart and I’m proud of her. Why wouldn’t I be honored to be her bio-mom? (Honored and very famous on talk shows, probably.) She looks like me a bit. Don’t you think?

Are you a crazy dog person too?

we love our dogs

17Nov/15

Finding the perfect leash and collar (for you)

The other night this collar sparked an idea.

pinch collar

I was talking to a WOOF client (hi Michelle!) while one of our staff members (hi Victoria!) was in back struggling with this prong collar (hello … collar).

This collar. Not our favorite.

pinch collarpinch collarpinch collar 🙁 😥  🙁

They get tangled. Links fall off. They hurt your fingers. They’re really hard to put on an excited dog who knows his parents are here and can’twaittogetoutthere! But mainly, they just don’t work very well.

It’s not a particularly attractive collar, or user-friendly. And yet I see folks using it all the time. In fact, I know a lot of smart (especially strong-fingered) people who use this collar. And I get it  – it’s supposed to discourage dogs from pulling. And when you have a dog who pulls, you are willing to try anything.

devil dog

Even a collar that looks like this –

pinch collar

Instead of, say, this –

cupcake collar

Or (if you are gluten-intolerant, even for decorations) this –

blue collar

So I asked the client – “Do you like this collar?” And you know what she said? “No, not really!” And we had a nice laugh and discussed some alternatives.

Sigh.

My take-away from this conversation is that people buy a collar that’s supposed to perform a certain way and end up keeping it even if it doesn’t perform as advertised. Maybe blaming themselves that they’re not using it right, or their dog is just extra-determined to stick with the negative behavior that the collar was supposed to discourage.

And that makes me sad because a good product – used correctly, sure, sure – should work! But I’ve never seen a dog respond particularly well to the prong collar. (If you have, please do tell in the comment section!) I see them pulling anyway, digging those medieval-looking claws into their skin and dragging their owner along in the process.

What I mostly see with this collar is frustrated dogs, frustrated parents and – hello WOOFers! – frustrated dog professionals trying to deal with the darn thing.

Let’s look at it again, just for fun.

pinch collar

You bad old collar, you.

How do we end up with the leashes and collars we have? Maybe it’s a combination of what’s familiar, what we’ve been told to use by “experts” and what’s just convenient for us.

But how SHOULD we choose them? Let me count the ways.

main collar fancy

I’m basing the following on my personal experiences with leashes and collars (which adds up to a lot if you count all the dogs and leash-collar combos I’ve dealt with in my career) – plus a little online research to make sure I’m giving you sound advice.

Having said all this, I want to make one thing clear: use the leash and collar that works for you. Even if it’s the prong collar of our aforementioned nightmares – it’s okay! We’ll deal with it if that’s what works for your dog.

Step one – what are your dog’s physical characteristics?

What does your dog look like? Take a good look.

your average dog

Is your dog BIG?

biglittle?

little

Does she have curly hair?

curly hair

Wiry hair?

wiry hair

Skin folds? (And a flat, super-adorable face?)

skin folds

All this can factor into your collar choice.

Step two: what is your dog’s walking style?

Is he a puller, eager to get to the next thing? A slow-poke, meandering past ever flower, sniffing everything? An escape artist, who can’t wait to slip out of his collar and run free?

A perfect gentleman, ideal in every way?

confidence

Oh, Rocky.

Now keep all those details in mind as you move on to –

Step three: knowing your options.

I know when you go to the pet store it’s pretty overwhelming.

IMG_2354

(I was mesmerized by this display today, and I was only in there for dog food.)

Even though it looks like there are endless options, there are really only a few kinds of collars – just with endless variations on those kinds. Let’s just focus on the basic types of collars.

choke chain

The classic choke chain. (The precursor to the prong collar, I think?) I remember these were used a lot when I was a kid (think 80s & 90s) but I don’t see them around much anymore. Although when you say “collar,” this is what some people will always picture. (Which is one of the main factors in how people choose their collars – and dog breeds, for that matter – just purely from what’s familiar/iconic for them.)

This is a fine collar in my book. The beauty of it is that it self-regulates. If your dog is pulling, it tightens. If your dog lets up, it loosens. It can be a great tool for training if you know how to use them judiciously.

But quite honestly my experience with this collar is that a dog who is determined to pull will pull (and pull and pull), choking himself silly. And also, if it’s not put on correctly, it doesn’t “give” – once it tightens, it stays tight. So I would only recommend this to someone who really knows how to use it and makes sure it’s not constantly choking their dog with no relief.

pinch collar

Back to the prong collar, and its kissing cousins –

prong

The plastic spiky prong collar (I named this myself)

This prong collar s a little easier to put on and manage, since the prongs aren’t detachable, but it poses all the same issues. If a dog pulls, the discomfort of the plastic spikes often doesn’t seem to stop them. A dog will pull those spikes right into his throat and not seem to understand the correlation between stopping pulling and relief. So, unless your dog responds to the pressure of the collar by letting up, I’m not a big fan.

thick and flat collarA variation on your basic martingale collar. I’ve come to learn that “martingale”is just a fancy word for collars that don’t have an opening and closing mechanism – they expand to fit over the dog’s neck and the pulling action of the leash shortens the collar’s girth to fit tightly around the neck. These are good for dogs who try to slip out of their collars – because the harder they pull, the tighter the collar gets.

regular collar

This is the most classic, basic collar. (I call this the Tiny Human Belt Collar.) It has the classic belt-like closure. I like this collar a lot because it does its job without too much user-education needed. I dislike having to put this kind of collar on a really excited dog, because getting the closure done properly requires the dog to be still. Too often, it’s put on using the wrong hole – either too loose or too tight – so your dog’s going to slip right out of it in the parking lot or you’re choking the poor thing.

regular collar with snap closure

This is the basic non-leather collar with a really convenient snap closure. This is definitely the collar I see most at WOOF and I really like this collar. You adjust it once and it stays the right size. It’s really easy to snap on a wiggly dog. It’s comfortable for dogs and they come in a lot of cute prints – I especially like the ones where you can stitch the dog’s name and phone number right on the collar. Also a nice option for quick ID for a lost dog without the jingly-jangly annoyance of tags.

rolled collar

Here’s your basic rolled collar. This is ideal for dogs with thick, double coats (like Bernese Mountain Dogs, Newfoundlands, St. Bernards etc) – the rolled material nestles gently inside the thick coat instead of mashing it down like a regular collar, causing tangles to form underneath and possible discomfort. (If you have a thick-coated dog, make sure you are constantly checking for matts – you can’t always see them, but you can feel them if you run your hand down the dog’s hair. They are really deep tangles that sit close to the skin and they hurt because the hair in the tangle is pulling on the hair growing out of the skin.)

halti

Here we see my personal favorite for dogs who pull: the head collar. (Also called the Halti and the Gentle Leader, and I’m sure other things.) I love this ingenious piece of equipment! It uses the same philosophy horse owners have been using for decades: an animal will stop pulling if they feel pressure on their nose, which is very sensitive. (Ever wondered why people lead bulls around with nose rings? This is a much more humane version of that idea.)

I had a Newfie named Clyde who was an angel … in his Halti. In fact, soon after buying the Halti I would only have to show him that I was putting it on and he knew what his limits were, and he didn’t even try to pull. So if you have a puller, try the head collar! I highly recommend it.

Then we get to the harnesses, which is by and far the biggest trend I’ve seen lately, especially among little dogs.

little harness

Harness proponents like them because they don’t put any pressure on the dog’s larynx. When the dog pulls, they are getting an even distribution of weight along their chest. That’s a good thing physiologically – especially for our flat-faced breeds like Pugs or Bulldogs, who already have a hard time breathing without a potentially crushed trachea.

But training-wise, it’s not such a good thing. If a pulling dog suffers zero discomfort when pulling, then guess what? They’ll continue to pull! In fact, some dog experts think dogs actually get some pleasure out of the act of pulling, so you’re only making it more “pleasurable” by using a harness.

Here’s a good article on whether to choose a collar or a harness. (I like a harness for little dogs, or flat-faced dogs, because their anatomy is a lot more delicate than a bigger dog and I think the protection a halter offers far outweighs the training downside. Also because a Chihuahua pulling is a lot less problematic than a Great Dane pulling…)

So, here we are knowing all about our dog and what is available. Let’s consider some example and think about what kind of equipment would be best in each scenario:

You have a Pug who loves to pull and has larygeal paralysis?

– try a HARNESS!

camou-harness

You have a Bernese Mountain Dog who doesn’t pull at all and goes to the groomer rarely (you groom him at home)?

– try a ROLLED COLLAR!

rolled collar

You have that Bernese Mountain Dog’s brother who pulls like the dickens?

halti

– try a HALTI!

You have a sweet-natured and gigantic Mastiff who doesn’t pull but is notorious for escaping out of his collar?

thick and flat collar

– try a martingale-style big, flat cloth collar!

And if his fur matts up under that thick collar? (This one is a toughie…)

rolled-martingale

– try a martingale ROLLED collar!

I use the word “try” deliberately – make sure you TRY OUT a few things before settling on something that really isn’t working that great for you. If you can’t find a nice pet store employee to let you try a few things on your dog and walk them around the store, go to another store. Any good establishment will be willing to help you find the right equipment.

As far as leashes go, it’s much simpler. Just get a leash no longer than six feet. I don’t care what the material is or the style.

But never, ever, get one of these monsters.

retractable

The dreaded retractable leash.

I don’t know who likes this leash but it’s not any pet professional I’ve ever talked to. The problem is you have zero control over your dog. The locking mechanism that limits the amount of “leash” (which is really just a thin piece of rope material that can lacerate the heck out of human skin) is useless – it jams, it doesn’t work, or it lets out feet upon feet of leash when you are trying to reign in the dog.

Our ultimate nightmare combination:

retractablepinch collar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Just don’t get one of these. They’re so problematic, WOOF has “outlawed” them in our facility (although I still see one or two sneak in…) If you want your dog to have more room to run, find a good off-leash area. (Or bring them to WOOF!)

If you already have one of these, throw it away and get a regular leash. Please.

A leash and collar have to do two things: work for the dog and work for the owner. If it’s falling short in either area, I guarantee there’s something else on the market that will be a vast improvement.

And when you find your perfect leash and collar, your dog will look deeply into your eyes, give you a big kiss, and say, thank you, wonderful mommy. You’ve made my dreams come true.

kiss

Not really. She’ll jump all over you and say, let’s go for a walk, fool!

What kind of collar works for you?

 

02Oct/15

Trendy dog names

Choosing your dog’s name is one of the more fun parts of – let’s use a word out of fashion – dog husbandry. (Dog wifery? Dog womanry?)

Boomer fancy

And I’ve always been curious: how do people go about it? What makes a good dog name?

Heidi fancy

In my years in the pet service industry, I’ve seen names come, names go, and names stay. (Max, for example, is here to stay, I think. Oh, the many wonderful and varied Max’s I’ve met! And the many more Max’s sure to come!)

Max fancy

(This is the smallest Max I’ve met, but one of the best!)

It’s the trendy names that interest me most. When I suddenly noticed a bunch of Kai’s walking into the veterinarian office or doggy daycare, I knew something was afoot. (What ever happened to Rover?)

Lucky fancy

These trendy names – they catch on like wildfire and leave me scratching my head, not for the quality of the names themselves, but the way they somehow worm their way into people’s brains and become the moniker du jour.

Rosie 2 fancy

Rosie too fancy

(And Rosie is not even on the trendy list!)

Here’s a sampling from one of the most recent trendy dog lists I found online, showing the top ten names for both sexes (full article here):

The girls:

Elsa, Bella, Stella, Quinn, Sophie, Ivy, Charlie (a girl Charlie!), Aurora, Avery and Lila.

The boys:

Sawyer, Jack, Hudson, Finn, Emerson, Bear, Puppy, Max, Kai and Cooper.

Luna fancy

At WOOF, we have at least one representative for each of these names (except Aurora and Emerson – any Auroras or Emersons want to come to WOOF? You could be a trailblazer!)

We mostly have a lot of Max’s, Coopers and Bellas. Lots and lots of Bellas! (And Murphy’s, but that’s not on this year’s list.)

Frank fancy

Yet only one Frank. Hmmm.

Ruby fancy

I have my own approach to choosing my dogs’ names: I look at the dog, cast my eyes skyward, see a bunch of names circling in a little imaginary name cloud, and blurt something out. Then my dogs get stuck with my whim (you’re welcome Sherman, Penny, Woody and Clyde!)

Zeppelin fancyMany of my dogs already came with a name, because they were rescues.

lady fancy

I could have changed their names, but it just didn’t feel right. For example, Lady has been Lady for many years before she lived with me – she knows it, she responds to it. And although it wouldn’t have been my first choice, it seems to fit her. (She is one of the most feminine female dogs I’ve ever had!) So Lady it has stayed.

Bowie fancy

I believe Bowie was named after David Bowie, who famously had two different-colored eyes too.

Smoke fancy

And Smoke for his smoky colors? (Or maybe because he enjoys cigars – I’m not sure yet; we haven’t hung out together socially.)

Sarge fancy

I’m also still getting to know Sarge, but so far the name seems to suit him. He’s kind of a take-charge sort of fellow. (As most bulldogs are.)

Personally, I like dogs with human names. For example, I’m dying to one day name a dog Gary. No idea why. I also like Doris or Joan. The dignity of a human name attached to a dog just tickles me.

Morty fancy

Ah, Morty. Perfection.

How did you choose your dog’s name?